'OM' Crossing at Kripalu 

'OM' Crossing at Kripalu 

I keep thinking that the greatest couturiers are authors in their own right. They keep fascinating me with their ability to “write” on the sleeves of a jacket, on the hem of a dress, the obscure phrases of fashion. I like the idea that a couturier finds a style while cutting with his scissors, in the same way as a writer would do with a pen. Alaïa has his very own form of writing, in the same way as Rei Kawakubo has her own vocabulary. There is no dictionary yet to encompass their words – which, by the way, are the same as the ones we use about literary writing. It is a fabric, a thread, forms. Everything becomes different with the practice of their skills. What connects poetry and costume history probably has to do with those who live in it. These clothes, our twins tired of ourselves, inspire literature and poetry not as much because of their shapes or the décor they symbolise as because of the concave of convex mirror with which they present us an image of ourselves.
— Olivier Saillard, When asked the question, “You are passionate about poetry, and about costume history. What is the connection between the two?” by AnOther magazine 

surf4ces:

omfg

My friends and I drank a whole bottle of vodka tonight while hanging out and playing cards against humanity. And I won. #feellikeaboss 

le-petit-dejeuner:

Goddess of all things

le-petit-dejeuner:

Goddess of all things

Possible Breakthrough: I may have figured out what I’m going to dress up as for Halloween! I’ve been wracking my brain since September (when my friends mentioned that they wanted to dress up and go out) and I’ve finally thought of dressing as Lucille Ball from I Love Lucy. I already have a 50’s style dress and all I would need is a cute apron since I have the pearls, the hair color (sort of), and hopefully some of her wit! What do you think about this idea?

arabellesicardi:

The Door, by Ava DuVernay, the fifth Miu Miu Women’s Tale, is a celebration of the transformative power of feminine bonds, and a symbolic story of life change.

The symbolic centre of The Door is the front entrance of the protagonist’s home. As she opens it to greet a friend in the powerfully framed opening scenes, she is shrouded in an oblique sadness. “In the film, characters arrive at the door of a friend in need, bringing something of themselves,” explains director DuVernay. “Eventually, we witness our heroine ready to walk through the door on her own. The door in the film represents a pathway to who we are.”

Clothing is also a symbol of renewal, each change of costume charting our heroine’s emergence from a chrysalis of sadness. In the final scenes, she takes off her ring, pulls on long, black leather gloves, and walks, transformed by the emotive power of the clothing, through the door. 

Ava DuVernay was the first African-American woman to win the Best Director Prize at Sundance Film Festival, for her second feature, Middle of Nowhere, in 2012. The Door stars Gabrielle Union, Alfre Woodard, Emayatzy Corinealdi, Adepero Oduye and singer-songwriter Goapele.

Link to 30 seconds trailer: http://youtu.be/PBtZ1ZwDRjA
Link to behind the scenes video: http://youtu.be/TzKBi0zU96I

This is also a phenomenal fashion/beauty film that transcends the genre & is centered around black womanhood.